NEW ZEALAND
TARANAKI

FUN! Science Activites and Projects

Welcome to the training room for young scientists.

Many activities are based on PREDICT, OBSERVE, EXPLAIN strategies to get students engaged, while others are technical or Science Fair projects we have been involved with.

Many of the projects below have won prizes at Science Fair

Astronomy

(Planet Earth and Beyond)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biology

(Living World)

 

The nature of science... What should 'doing science' look like in our classrooms?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chemistry

(Material World)

 

The nature of science... What should 'doing science' look like in our classrooms?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Physics

(Physical World)

 

The nature of science... What should 'doing science' look like in our classrooms?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students never too young to do science...

 

 

The nature of science... What should 'doing science' look like in our classrooms?

Bike indicator - at age 7, she was the youngest student to enter science fair and wanted to make riding a bike safer

Classroom noise meter - a 10 year old student's science fair project is being commercially produced by the National Foundation for the Deaf

Gifted Children - support and ideas for teachers and parents, including case studies of interventions that worked very well.

Lethal lunch boxes - another 10 year old student winning science fair project using a temperature sensor to monitor food spoilage

Scientific Journalism winner - Do the benefits of science outweigh the risks? As printed by the Royal Society

A team effort - students of different ages, abilities and interests make a great team for New Zealands school-based research group

Designing experiments a template for fair testing and the scientific method

 

Teaching / Learning / Pedagogy

(The neXus files)

 

 

The nature of science... What should 'doing science' look like in our classrooms?

 

Primary Science Teacher Fellows Science takes a front seat in the revitalisation of science education in New Zealand

 

 

 

  • Interactive ICT tools for Mathematics, Science and Robotics - getting the most from Game Maker. Presented at the New Zealand Association of Mathematics Teachers conference, NZAMT 2007
  • eLearning research report: Authentic learning using mobile sensor technology with reflections on the state of science education in New Zealand
  • ICT: Interested in Conversations and Thinking - technology is less important than the conversations it permits students to have with their teacher. For the techno-phobic this puts the student in the role of expert technologist but the teacher remains the expert assessor.
  • School science earns an F. Research by local scientist and Microsoft Innovative Teacher Michael Fenton indicates that the state of New Zealand's science teaching is antiquated and inadequate. What are some examples of 'best practice' when using computers in education, particularly to teach science?
  • Saving New Zealand Science. Why are scientists meeting to discuss flaws in NZQA science exams? Is it a case of dumbing the curriculum down or scientists being ' too academic' and expecting too much? How does NZQA pressure resource writers to perpetuate errors of fact in books and hence examinations?
  • Teaching and the f word: From the New Zealand INTERFACE article....putting the fun back into teaching while dealing with the competing tensions of assessment and covering the curriculum. For primary and secondary teachers

 

Some of the material included here is adapted from:
"Build-it-yourself Science Laboratory" by R. Barrett (1963)
"100 Amazing Make-it-yourself Science Fair Projects" by G. Vecchione (1994)
Taumarunui High School "Practical Science" by M. Fenton (1995-1996)
 

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